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dc.creatorDeArmond, DeArno D.
dc.date.available2011-02-18T21:16:18Z
dc.date.issued2009-05
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2346/15826en_US
dc.description.abstractStudies discussing success within financial planning have been open to definitional interpretation and without regard to both the objective and subjective elements of success. Empirical studies considering client management, client demographic, personal, job, and business practices have been limited at best. This research is the first to test whether preference for numerical information and need for emotion are contributors to perceived level of success within financial planners. The purpose of this research was to 1) analyze the manner upon which objective and subjective factors (such as pay, promotion, status, work/life balance) have contributed to the perceived level of success of individuals working as financial planners, 2) analyze client management, client demographic, personal, job, or business practice factor differences contributing to the self-reported success of an individual working as a financial planner, and 3) to test for differences between a financial planner with a preference for numerical information and a financial planner with a preference for emotion with regard to self-perceived success within the financial planning industry. The data utilized within this study were gathered via a survey instrument developed and administered in an online format during the month of June 2008. A total of 403 geographically diverse respondents (4% response rate) who are members of the FPA answered the survey. The final sample used after data reduction and incomplete responses was 349 respondents (3.5%). The survey remained open from June 4th to July 3rd, 2008. Results of this study indicate that client relationships, wealth of client served, use of ethical practices, ability to empathize, number of clients served, client referrals, and job autonomy are among the most important contributors to financial planner perceived success. Findings of this study also indicate that client relationships, wealth of client served, use of ethical practices, ability to empathize, number of clients served, client referrals, and job autonomy are among the most important contributors to financial planner perceived success. Results of this study also conclude there is no relationship between preference for numerical information or need for emotion and financial planner perceived success.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherTexas Tech Universityen_US
dc.subjectPersonal financial planen_US
dc.subjectFinancial planningen_US
dc.subjectSuccessen_US
dc.titleSUCCESS within the financial planning profession
dc.typeDissertation
thesis.degree.namePh.D.
thesis.degree.levelDoctoral
thesis.degree.disciplineApplied and Professional Studies
thesis.degree.grantorTexas Tech University
thesis.degree.departmentApplied and Professional Studies
dc.contributor.committeeMemberGustafson, William
dc.contributor.committeeMemberHampton, Vickie L.
dc.contributor.committeeMemberKatz, Deena
dc.contributor.committeeMemberTerry, Neil
dc.contributor.committeeMemberWilliams, Amanda
dc.contributor.committeeChairDurband, Dorothy B.
dc.degree.departmentApplied and Professional Studiesen_US
dc.rights.availabilityUnrestricted.


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