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dc.creatorDiana, Lisa Ann Kasch
dc.date.available2011-02-19T00:33:34Z
dc.date.issued1995-08
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2346/21788en_US
dc.description.abstractKelley's (1979) Interdependence Theory and his (1983) conceptualization of love and commitment as well as Johnson's (1991) framework of commitment formed the basis for hypotheses regarding the prediction of commitment from love and other variables. From a sample of college students who were primarily steadily dating, mixed support for the hypotheses was obtained. Using Steck et al.'s (1983) love subscales, the caring aspect of love was not more predictive of commitment than the trust or need aspects of love. Unexpectedly, factor analysis on Steck et al.'s (1983) love scale resulted in two rather than three components of love. As expected, the predictors of commitment were associated with one another. Contrary to predictions, structural, external variables (alternatives to the current relationship) were more predictive of commitment than personal, internal variables (love and inequity). Implications and suggestions for future research are discussed.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherTexas Tech Universityen_US
dc.subjectMan-woman relationshipsen_US
dc.subjectIntimacy (Psychology)en_US
dc.subjectLoveen_US
dc.titleLove and commitment in close relationships
dc.typeThesis
thesis.degree.nameM.S.
thesis.degree.levelMasters
thesis.degree.disciplineHuman Development
thesis.degree.grantorTexas Tech University
thesis.degree.departmentHuman Development
thesis.degree.departmentHuman Development and Family Studies
dc.degree.departmentHuman Developmenten_US
dc.rights.availabilityUnrestricted.


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