Show simple item record

dc.creatorPaul, Abhijit
dc.date.available2011-02-19T01:03:59Z
dc.date.issued2009-08
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2346/22559en_US
dc.description.abstractThe equilibrium analysis of trip assignment, the contemporary approach, requires individual level origin-destination (O-D) trip surveys that are cost intensive and time consuming. On the other hand, the axial analysis of space syntax, an alternative approach, is less cost intensive and time efficient, but it does not estimate vehicular travel demands with accuracy for a grid-type road layout. This dissertation research integrates both approaches and proposes a new vehicular travel demand model: unit segment analysis. Using the road layouts of a small residential neighborhood and then a typical North American urban settlement, this research shows that unit segment analysis estimates vehicular travel demands with higher accuracy than both equilibrium analysis and axial analysis for the city of Lubbock where road layout is gridded. The findings of this research suggest that along with travel times of O-D routes, flow characteristics of routes also influence the trip makers’ decision of route choice and consequently impact vehicular travel demands of settlement roads. This study discusses several other factors, like land-use influence and edge effect that influence an area's traffic flow, and it delineates a methodology to address these parameters into the proposed unit segment analysis. This research contributes to the planning field by developing a robust planning tool that will guide planners in justifying their planning decisions with data-based evidence in designing transportation policies for infrastructure developments of urban settlements, including development of evacuation plans for emergencies.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherTexas Tech Universityen_US
dc.subjectIntegrationen_US
dc.subjectNetwork topologyen_US
dc.subjectTrip assignmenten_US
dc.titleAn integrated approach to modeling vehicular movement networks : Trip assignment and space syntax
dc.typeDissertation
thesis.degree.namePh.D.
thesis.degree.levelDoctoral
thesis.degree.disciplineArchitecture
thesis.degree.grantorTexas Tech University
thesis.degree.departmentArchitecture
dc.degree.departmentArchitectureen_US
dc.rights.availabilityUnrestricted.


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record