Show simple item record

dc.creatorShockley, William
dc.date.available2013-01-24T20:12:19Z
dc.date.issued2012-12
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2346/47472
dc.description.abstractA characteristic of democratic citizens is cynicism of their governments. “Critical Citizens” theory accredits this behavior to increased awareness of government performance, but holds that citizens have strong attachments toward democracy. “Critical Citizens” theory has largely unexplained the role of religion and news politics on public support for democracies. This work seeks to explain how religion and news politics affect public support of governments. In doing so I find that religious worship increases attachments toward authority and political leaders, implying that religion increases support of government. Additionally, I find that support of democracy increases the likelihood of news politics consumption, while support for political leaders decreases the likelihood one consumes news politics. These findings contribute to “Critical Citizens” theory by answering how religion and news politics affect public support of government.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoeng
dc.subjectComparative politics
dc.subjectPolitical science
dc.subjectCritical citizens
dc.subjectNews
dc.subjectNews politics
dc.subjectReligion
dc.subjectGovernment support
dc.titleAssessing public support of government in democratic countries
dc.typeThesis
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Arts
thesis.degree.levelMasters
thesis.degree.disciplinePolitical Science
thesis.degree.grantorTexas Tech University
thesis.degree.departmentPolitical Science
dc.contributor.committeeMemberPatterson, Dennis
dc.contributor.committeeMemberMurray, Gregg R.
dc.contributor.committeeChairMayer, Lawrence C.
dc.rights.availabilityUnrestricted.


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record