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dc.creatorStraub, John E. I I
dc.creatorPlumlee, Debrah K.
dc.creatorGazda, Daniel B.
dc.creatorWallace, William T.
dc.date.accessioned2016-07-28T19:41:25Z
dc.date.available2016-07-28T19:41:25Z
dc.date.issued2016-07-10
dc.identifier.otherICES_2016_416
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2346/67722
dc.descriptionUnited States
dc.descriptionWyle
dc.descriptionNASA
dc.description303
dc.descriptionICES303: Physio-Chemical Life Support- Water Recovery & Management Systems- Technology and Process Development
dc.descriptionVienna, Austria
dc.descriptionJohn E. Straub II, Wyle Science, Technology and Engineering Group, USA
dc.descriptionDebrah K. Plumlee, Wyle Science, Technology and Engineering Group, USA
dc.descriptionWilliam T. Wallace, Wyle Science, Technology and Engineering Group, USA
dc.descriptionDaniel B. Gazda, NASA Johnson Space Center, USA
dc.descriptionThe 46th International Conference on Environmental Systems was held in Vienna, Austria, USA on 10 July 2016 through 14 July 2016.
dc.description.abstract2015 marked the 15th anniversary of continuous human presence on board the International Space Station. During the past year crew members from Expeditions 42-46, including two participating in a one-year mission, continued to rely on reclaimed water as their primary source of potable water. This paper presents and discusses results from chemical analyses performed on ISS water samples returned in 2015. Since the U.S. water processor assembly (WPA) became operational in 2008, there have been 5 instances of organic contaminants breaking through the treatment process. On each occasion, the breakthrough was signaled by an increase in the total organic carbon (TOC) concentration in the product water measured by the onboard TOC analyzer (TOCA). Although the most recent TOC rise in 2015 was not unexpected, it was the first time where dimethylsilanediol (DMSD) was not the primary compound responsible for the increase. Results from ground analysis of a product water sample collected in June of 2015 and returned on Soyuz 41 showed that DMSD only accounted for 10% of the measured TOC. After considerable laboratory investigation, the compound responsible for the majority of the TOC was identified as monomethysilanetriol (MMST). MMST is a low-toxicity compound that is structurally similar to DMSD.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisher46th International Conference on Environmental Systems
dc.subjectISS potable water characterization
dc.subjectU.S. water processor assembly
dc.subjectISS total organic carbon analyzer
dc.titleChemical Characterization and Identification of Organosilicon Contaminants in ISS Potable Water
dc.typePresentation


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