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dc.creatorLarkin, Murl A.
dc.date.accessioned2018-09-19T19:46:01Z
dc.date.available2018-09-19T19:46:01Z
dc.date.issued1971
dc.identifier.citation3 Tex. Tech L. Rev. 55en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2346/74601
dc.description.abstractThe author claims that the legislation regarding confessions is ambiguous and unclear. The author explains each part of the law and how each part does not clearly state Texas’s law regarding confessions. The grammatical errors in the law render a different interpretation on the rules for confessions than the intended meaning of the legislature. The author poses the question of whether the Texas law prevails over the case law on confessions from Miranda v. Arizona. The author looks at the content of the Texas Res Gestae rule and compares it to the rules set forth in Miranda. After comparing the different laws, the author notes that the question of what counts as a confession in the state of Texas still remains. Thus, the author suggest that the current law on confessions be repealed and makes suggestions for how the confession law should be written.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherTexas Tech Law Reviewen_US
dc.subjectConfessionen_US
dc.subjectMirandaen_US
dc.subjectCustodyen_US
dc.subjectTexas Res Gestae lawen_US
dc.subjectRes Gestaeen_US
dc.subjectMiranda v. Arizonaen_US
dc.titleConfessions in Texas Revisiteden_US
dc.typeArticleen_US


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