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dc.creatorPearl, M. Alexander
dc.date.accessioned2019-08-26T15:48:31Z
dc.date.available2019-08-26T15:48:31Z
dc.date.issued2018
dc.identifier.citation53 Wake Forest L. Rev. 713en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2346/85078
dc.description.abstractLooks at why climate change is so devastating to indigenous peoples across the world and how legal institutions may be utilized to incorporate the voices of indigenous peoples and drive a better societal response to climate change. First, Part II briefly addresses the science of climate change while focusing on the distinctive violence of the commons problem of climate change as applied to indigenous peoples. Next, Part III addresses the story of indigenous peoples in the Climate Crisis from the point of protests regarding the extraction of carbon resources, the current and ongoing climate-induced loss of life and culture experienced by indigenous peoples, and the potential solutions for mitigation that reside within indigenous lands. Part IV proceeds by identifying common problems for indigenous peoples in working with colonial nations and suggests certain approaches to integrating indigenous rights into the larger context of human rights and climate change through consultation and litigation. Part V provides a brief conclusion.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherWake Forest Law Reviewen_US
dc.subjectIndigenous peoplesen_US
dc.subjectHuman rightsen_US
dc.subjectClimateen_US
dc.subjectClimate changeen_US
dc.subjectClimate crisisen_US
dc.subjectCarbon productionen_US
dc.titleHuman Rights, Indigenous Peoples, and the Global Climate Crisisen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US


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