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dc.creatorCisneros, George D.
dc.date.accessioned2019-10-14T18:55:39Z
dc.date.available2019-10-14T18:55:39Z
dc.date.issued1980
dc.identifier.citation11 Tex. Tech L. Rev. 637en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2346/85235
dc.description.abstractExamines the developments and complications associated with underground water law. Since the development of additional surface water would require large public expenditures, the need for effective underground water conservation in Texas is imperative. Unfortunately, the Texas Supreme Court and legislature have created a legal environment that is incompatible with effective conservation. Generally, the system's failure can be attributed to two factors: (1) the Texas Supreme Court has continued to apply the archaic English rule of absolute ownership of underground water; and (2) the legislature has delegated the power to regulate groundwater to those least likely to exercise it - the users of underground water. The author contends that the complications with the water law are a response to the practices of extensive pumping on the coast and other uses throughout the state.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherTexas Tech Law Reviewen_US
dc.subjectWateren_US
dc.subjectUnderground wateren_US
dc.subjectReasonable use doctrineen_US
dc.subjectCorrelative rights doctrineen_US
dc.subjectAppropriation doctrineen_US
dc.subjectWater managementen_US
dc.subjectWater lawen_US
dc.subjectUnderground water lawen_US
dc.titleTexas Underground Water Law: The Need For Conservation and Protection of a Limited Resourceen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US


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