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dc.creatorCampbell, Alan L.
dc.creatorJohnson, Marcus C.
dc.date.accessioned2020-02-24T16:06:06Z
dc.date.available2020-02-24T16:06:06Z
dc.date.issued1984
dc.identifier.citation15 Tex. Tech L. Rev. 479en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2346/85647
dc.description.abstractOn July 13, 1983, the Texas Supreme Court decided Duncan v.. Cessna Aircraft Co., this began a significant change in Texas law. The court held that, in cases tried after the effective date of the decision, a strictly liable products defendant may obtain a jury allocation of damages according to all parties' respective percentages of fault. This article will discuss and analyze the Duncan decision as well as the evolution of strict products liability in Texas, which led to that landmark decision.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherTexas Tech Law Reviewen_US
dc.subjectStrict products liabilityen_US
dc.subjectComparative apportionmenten_US
dc.subjectDamagesen_US
dc.subjectDefensesen_US
dc.subjectNegligenceen_US
dc.subject“Mary Carter” agreementsen_US
dc.subjectDuncan v. Cessna Aircraft Co.en_US
dc.titleTexas Adopts a System of Pure Comparative Apportionment for Strict Products Liability Casesen_US
dc.title.alternativeTexas Adopts a System of Pure Comparative Apportionment for Strict Products Liability Cases: Duncan v. Cessna Aircraft Co., 26 Tex. Sup. Ct. J. 507 (July 16, 1983)en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US


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