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dc.creatorLee, Temple R.
dc.creatorPal, Sandip
dc.date.accessioned2021-01-08T16:16:57Z
dc.date.available2021-01-08T16:16:57Z
dc.date.issued2021
dc.identifier.citationLee, T.R. & Pal, S. (2021). The impact of height-independent errors in state variables on the determination of the daytime atmospheric boundary layer depth using the bulk Richardson approach. Journal of Atmospheric and Oceanic Technology, 38(1), 47-61 https://doi.org/10.1175/JTECH-D-20-0135.1en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.1175/JTECH-D-20-0135.1
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2346/86629
dc.description© Copyright 2021 American Meteorological Society (AMS). For permission to reuse any portion of this work, please contact permissions@ametsoc.org. Any use of material in this work that is determined to be “fair use” under Section 107 of the U.S. Copyright Act (17 U.S. Code §?107) or that satisfies the conditions specified in Section 108 of the U.S. Copyright Act (17 USC § 108) does not require the AMS’s permission. Republication, systematic reproduction, posting in electronic form, such as on a website or in a searchable database, or other uses of this material, except as exempted by the above statement, requires written permission or a license from the AMS. All AMS journals and monograph publications are registered with the Copyright Clearance Center (https://www.copyright.com). Additional details are provided in the AMS Copyright Policy statement, available on the AMS website (https://www.ametsoc.org/PUBSCopyrightPolicy).en_US
dc.description.abstractRawinsonde observations have long been used to estimate the atmospheric boundary layer depth (BLD), which is an important parameter for monitoring air quality, dispersion studies, weather forecast models, and inversion systems for estimating regional surface–atmosphere fluxes of tracers. Although many approaches exist for deriving the BLDs from rawinsonde observations, the bulk Richardson approach has been found to be most appropriate. However, the impact of errors in the measured thermodynamic and kinematic fields on the estimated BLDs remains unexplored. We argue that quantifying BLD error (δBLD) estimates is equally as important as the BLDs themselves. Here we quantified δBLD by applying the bulk Richardson method to 35 years of rawinsonde data obtained from three stations in the United States: Sterling, Virginia; Amarillo, Texas; and Salt Lake City, Utah. Results revealed similar features in terms of their respective errors. A −2°C bias in temperature yielded a mean δBLD ranging from −15 to 200 m. A +2°C bias in temperature yielded a mean δBLD ranging from −214 to +18 m. For a −5% relative humidity bias, the mean δBLD ranged from −302 to +7 m. For a +5% relative humidity bias, the mean δBLD ranged from +2 to +249 m. Differences of ±2 m s−1 in the winds yielded BLD errors of ~±300 m. The δBLD increased as a function of BLD when introducing errors to the thermodynamic fields and decreased as a function of BLD when introducing errors to the kinematic fields. These findings expand upon previous work evaluating rawinsonde-derived δBLD by quantifying δBLD arising from rawinsonde-derived thermodynamic and kinematic measurements. Knowledge of δBLD is critical in, for example, intercomparison studies where rawinsonde-derived BLDs are used as references.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherAmerican Meteorological Societyen_US
dc.subjectBoundary Layeren_US
dc.subjectRadiosonde Observationsen_US
dc.subjectError Analysisen_US
dc.titleThe impact of height-independent errors in state variables on the determination of the daytime atmospheric boundary layer depth using the bulk Richardson approachen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US


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