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dc.creatorMarlowe, Meghan
dc.creatorAlraeesi, Ahmed
dc.creatorVelez, Gustavo Aguilar
dc.creatorMarlar, James
dc.creatorWibisono, Arfan
dc.creatorScheidemantel, Coby
dc.creatorStaats, Kai
dc.creatorAdams, John
dc.date.accessioned2021-06-24T22:05:22Z
dc.date.available2021-06-24T22:05:22Z
dc.date.issued7/12/2021
dc.identifier.otherICES-2021-434
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2346/87313
dc.descriptionMeghan Marlowe, University of Arizona
dc.descriptionAhmed Alraeesi, University of Arizona
dc.descriptionGustavo Aguilar Velez, University of Arizona
dc.descriptionJames Marlar, University of Arizona
dc.descriptionArfan Wibisono, University of Arizona
dc.descriptionCoby Scheidemantel, University of Arizona
dc.descriptionKai Staats, Over The Sun
dc.descriptionJohn Adams, Biosphere 2 / University of Arizona
dc.descriptionICES305: Environmental and Thermal Control of Commercial and Exploration Spacecraften
dc.descriptionThe 50th International Conference on Environmental Systems was held virtually on 12 July 2021 through 14 July 2021.en_US
dc.description.abstractAs humans look to travel off-world, sealed habitats will be essential for life support in long-duration missions. Previous closed ecosystem experiments have ranged from closed-loop habitats sustaining a single individual (NASA�s Biohome) to large scale self-contained systems designed to support a full crew (Biosphere 2, Lunar Palace 1). To date, human-in-the-loop, closed ecosystem studies have focused on either mechanical life support or bio regeneration for extended space missions. The Space Analog for the Moon and Mars (SAM) at Biosphere 2 aims to meld these two approaches. SAM will consist of the historic Test Module greenhouse connected to a crew quarters and airlocks, surrounded by a simulated Mars yard. Any sealed chamber must be prepared for potential interior cabin pressure loss and be able to compensate for changing external pressures where an external atmosphere exists, especially in the case of inflatables. The Test Module includes an existing analog pressure regulating system. The added crew quarters will require an independent pressure regulating system. A team of six engineering students at the University of Arizona is working with the executive team at SAM and Biosphere 2 to design and prototype the Automated Pressure Regulation System (APRS) for the SAM crew quarters. The goal of the system is to maintain a positive pressure in relation to the outside environment, preventing potential biocontaminants from entering. The APRS is a semi-closed system, drawing from an internal air source and external air resupply. To verify the APRS design, a 1:10 scaled model of the overall system and crew quarters are being constructed. The APRS consists of four subsystems: a compressor system, scaled crew quarter module with a utility wall, sensor subassembly, and GUI subassembly. This paper will discuss the overall mechanical system, software design, and test validation procedures proposed for the APRS.en_US
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisher50th International Conference on Environmental Systemsen_US
dc.subjecthabitat
dc.subjectmars
dc.subjectresearch station
dc.subjectbiosphere 2
dc.subjectautomated pressure regulation system
dc.subjecthermetically sealed
dc.subjectcrew quarters
dc.subjectautomated pressure regulating system
dc.titleScaled Automated Pressure Regulation System for Analog Moon and Mars Habitaten_US
dc.typePresentationen_US


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