Excluding Criminal Evidence Texas-Style: Can Private Searches Poison the Fruit?

dc.creatorBubany, Charles P.
dc.creatorCockerell, Perry J.
dc.date.accessioned2019-10-25T16:30:13Z
dc.date.available2019-10-25T16:30:13Z
dc.date.issued1981
dc.description.abstractExamines the extent to which the Texas exclusionary rule applies to private persons as well as the government. Texas provides greater protections to criminal defendants than does the federal government, making evidence illegally obtained by private individuals also fruit of the poisonous tree. The authors express uncertainty at whether the law requires these private persons to be acting in concert with law enforcement.en_US
dc.identifier.citation12 Tex. Tech L. Rev. 611en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2346/85266
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherTexas Tech Law Reviewen_US
dc.subjectFruit of the poisonous treeen_US
dc.subjectExclusionary ruleen_US
dc.subjectEvidenceen_US
dc.subjectCriminal procedureen_US
dc.subjectTexasen_US
dc.titleExcluding Criminal Evidence Texas-Style: Can Private Searches Poison the Fruit?en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US

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