Analysis of Chemical and Microbial Components Adsorbed on the Ion Exchange Bed in the Oxygen Generation System Recirculation Loop

dc.creatorBowman, Elizabeth
dc.creatorCramblit, Eric
dc.creatorBowman, Danielle
dc.creatorDunlap, Darren
dc.creatorWilson, Mark
dc.creatorGhariani, Ahmed
dc.creatorObashe, Omoniyi
dc.creatorVan Keuren, Steve
dc.date.accessioned2017-07-07T22:24:21Z
dc.date.available2017-07-07T22:24:21Z
dc.date.issued2017-07-16
dc.descriptionElizabeth Bowman, The Boeing Company, USA
dc.descriptionEric Cramblit, The Boeing Company, USA
dc.descriptionDanielle Bowman, The Boeing Company, USA
dc.descriptionDarren Dunlap, The Boeing Company, USA
dc.descriptionMark Wilson, The Boeing Company, USA
dc.descriptionAhmed Ghariani, Jacobs Technology, Inc., USA
dc.descriptionOmoniyi Obashe, The Boeing Company, USA
dc.descriptionSteve Van Keuren, Anadarko Industries, LLC, USA
dc.descriptionICES404: International Space Station ECLS: Systems
dc.descriptionThe 47th International Conference on Environmental Systems was held in South Carolina, USA on 16 July 2017 through 20 July 2017.
dc.description.abstractSince 2007, the Oxygen Generation System (OGS) on board the International Space Station (ISS) has been producing oxygen for crew respiration via water electrolysis. As water is consumed in the OGS recirculating water loop, make-up water is furnished by the ISS potable water bus. During the operation of OGA on ISS, the recirculation loop water chemistry has experienced some changes, upsets, and recoveries. In early 2011, acidic byproducts from degradation of the cell stack membrane drove the recirculation loop pH well below neutral. Near neutral pH was recovered via ISS crew installation of a mixed resin deionizing bed (ACTEX-311) in the recirculation loop in May 2011. The ACTEX-311 removes the acidic byproducts of cell stack membrane degradation to keep the loop water pH near neutral which helps to minimize metallic corrosion and membrane degradation, and the ion exchange resin in the ACTEX-311 is also known to reversibly adsorb dimethylsilanediol (DMSD). To better understand the transport of acidic byproducts, DMSD, and any other species adsorbed by the ACTEX-311, a unit was returned to ground for sampling and analysis of the water and resin. The results of this cooperative effort are presented along with their implications for future ACTEX-311 installation.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.identifier.otherICES_2017_253
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2346/73045
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisher47th International Conference on Environmental Systems
dc.subjectoxygen generator
dc.subjectOGS
dc.subjectOGA
dc.subjectISS
dc.titleAnalysis of Chemical and Microbial Components Adsorbed on the Ion Exchange Bed in the Oxygen Generation System Recirculation Loopen_US
dc.typePresentations

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