Level of agreement between subjective and objective measures of youth physical activity

Date

2021-08

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Abstract

Although it is recommended that youth engage in daily physical activity (consisting of at least 60 minutes of moderate to vigorous intensity) to help decrease the likelihood of negative health outcomes, a majority of adolescents reportedly engage in insufficient activity. However, there are some limitations related to measuring youth physical activity, which could lead to inaccurate data in this area. Utilizing subjective measures in tandem with objective measures has been recommended; therefore, it is important to examine the level of agreement between subjective and objective measures of youth physical activity. The current study aimed to examine the level of agreement between these reporting methods and examine how youth depressive and anxiety symptoms can impact agreement levels. A sample of 67 youths (8-12 years-old) completed self-report questionnaires to assess depressive symptoms (i.e., CDI 2: SR[S]), anxiety symptoms (i.e., SCAS), and physical activity (i.e., PAQ-C). They were also instructed to wear an ActiGraph wGT3X-BT for at least 7 days. Bland-Altman analyses were conducted, and hierarchical regression models were built. Results revealed weak agreement between the PAQ-C and accelerometry data. Depressive and anxiety symptoms were not found to be independent, significant predictors of the difference between subjective and objective youth physical activity. However, interaction effects between depressive symptoms and subtypes of youth anxiety symptoms were found to be significant predictors of the difference scores between the methods of reporting. Strengths, limitations, and implications of the study are discussed.

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Keywords

Physical Activity, Subjective and Objective Measures, Youth Depressive Symptoms, Youth Anxiety Symptoms

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