Explaining the Victim-Offender Overlap of Cyberbullying Perpetration and Cyberbullying Victimization

Date
2022-12
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Abstract

Cyberbullying is a public health issue frequently experienced by adolescents that can have detrimental effects, including mental health issues and even suicide. While prior research has found that those involved in traditional bullying are more likely to experience cyberbullying, less is known about how bonds to school and family may protect against perpetration and victimization of both types of bullying. The study uses multiple perspectives— social bond theory, lifestyle/routine activities theory, and low self-control theory—to examine the victim/offender overlap of cyberbullying perpetration and cyberbullying victimization. It uses data from Arizona Youth Survey, a survey of middle and high school students that is representative of the state of Arizona. Bivariate probit models are estimated to assess relationships between the victim/offender overlap and predictor variables consistent with social bond theory. Building on prior research, several hypotheses are tested. Hypothesis 1: There is an overlap between cyberbullying offending and cyberbullying victimization. Hypothesis 2.1: Adolescents who have greater attachment to family will be less likely to perpetrate cyberbullying. Hypothesis 2.2: Adolescents who have greater attachment to family will be less likely to experience cyberbullying victimization. Hypothesis 3.1: Adolescents who are more involved with conventional activities will be less likely to perpetrate cyberbullying. Hypothesis 3.2: Adolescents who are more involved with conventional activities will be less likely to experience cyberbullying victimization. Hypothesis 4.1: Adolescents who have higher self-control will be less likely to perpetrate cyberbullying. Hypothesis 4.2: Adolescent who have higher self-control will be less likely to experience cyberbullying victimization. Hypothesis 5.1Adolescents who have risky lifestyles will be more likely to perpetrate cyberbullying. Hypothesis 5.2 Adolescents who have risky lifestyles will be more likely to experience cyberbullying victimization. The results were consistent with the hypotheses. Implications for theory, research, and practice are discussed.


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Keywords
Sociology, Cyberbullying, Victim-Offender Overlap
Citation