Beyond race: Colorism and the experiences of school psychologists of color

Date

2022-08

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Abstract

As the student population of the United States becomes more and more diverse, the amount of diversity within the field of education has lagged resulting in a racially homogeneous teaching workforce that does not reflect the students served (McGrady & Reynolds, 2016; National Center for Education Statistics, 2019). While efforts have been made to incorporate culturally responsive educational practices in public education, the fact remains that students from historically minoritized and marginalized backgrounds continue to face disparities that often lead to poor academic outcomes which can have far-reaching effects beyond elementary, middle, and high school (NCES, 2019). Teachers may very well lack competency in working with students from historically minoritized and marginalized backgrounds and look to school psychologists for support and consultation. School psychologists, however, may also lack competency in working with historically minoritized and marginalized students, especially since the field of school psychology is even more homogeneous when compared to the general teaching workforce (Goforth, et al., 2020). Additionally, while school psychologists of color may feel better equipped and more confident in serving historically minoritized and marginalized students, their competency and confidence, and thereby their self-efficacy, may be undermined, especially if they experience racial stressors, such as discrimination and microaggressions. This study examines the extent to which school psychologists of color experience racial stressors and the extent to which racial stressors impact the career self-efficacy of school psychologists of color.


Embargo status: Restricted until 09/2027. To request the author grant access, click on the PDF link to the left.

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Keywords

Colorism, School Psychologist

Citation