Static and dynamic components of right ventricular afterload are negatively associated with calf survival at high altitude

Abstract

The purposes of this study were to evaluate mean, systolic, and diastolic pulmonary arterial pressures; pulmonary arterial pulse pressures; and systemic oxygen extraction fraction as risk factors for the survival of suckling calves on one ranch located at an altitude of ≥ 2,730 m in Colorado, USA. A prospective cohort study of 58 calves was performed. Pulmonary arterial pressures and systemic oxygen extraction were measured when calves were approximately 3 mo (86 ± 7 d) and 7 mo (197 ± 6 d) of age. Seven of the 58 calves (12%), 4 steers and 3 heifers, were unaccounted for and presumed dead between 3 and 7 mo of age. Calves presumed to have died between 3 and 7 mo of age had significantly greater mean (P = 0.005) and systolic (P = 0.001) pulmonary arterial pressures and greater pulse pressures (P = 0.03) at 3 mo of age than calves that survived to 7 mo. Calves presumed to have died tended to have greater systemic oxygen extraction fractions at 3 mo of age than calves that survived (P = 0.13). Diastolic pressure was not associated with survival (P = 0.27). Mean pulmonary arterial pressure is predominantly determined by static resistance attributable to distal pulmonary arterial remodeling. Pulse pressure and systolic pulmonary arterial pressure represents the dynamic or oscillatory resistance and is determined by the characteristics of ventricular ejection and proximal arterial stiffness. These findings indicate that it may be beneficial to include pressure measurements indicative of both static and dynamic pulmonary arterial resistance in the selection of breeding stock at high altitude.

Description

© 2016 American Society of Animal Science. All rights reserved. None

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Citation

Neary, J.M., Brown, R.D., Holt, T.N., Stenmark, K.R., Enns, R.M., Thomas, M.G., & Garry, F.B.. 2016. Static and dynamic components of right ventricular afterload are negatively associated with calf survival at high altitude. Journal of Animal Science, 94(10). https://doi.org/10.2527/jas.2016-0652

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