The effect of interactive video simulated chemistry laboratories on learning outcomes and attitudes of students enrolled in a beginning college chemistry laboratory course

Date

1992-05

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Abstract

The introduction of new technology into the educational environment necessarily entails questions of how the technology can be most effectively used in the cognitive and affective domains. Hypermedia, a relatively new type of computer software, is different from nearly all other educational tools in that it can be either highly structured, unstructured, or configured in both modes. Research is needed to determine educational outcomes under these possible configurations. Chemistry laboratory instruction appears to be an inherent and necessary part of chemistry. However, the problems involved in the teaching of this course are many. The educational literature has reported successful use of interactive video in chemistry laboratories as a substitute for some laboratory experiments. Field-dependent and field-independent learners have different learning styles and characteristics. One of the research questions concerns the amount of learner control that is best for these styles of learning in computer-assisted instruction. The purpose of this study was: (a) to determine if there was a significant difference in achievement and attitude between learners in an interactive video simulated chemistry laboratory course utilizing an unstructured hypermedia program with no section questions or a structured hypermedia program with section questions, and (b) to ascertain if there was a significant difference in achievement and attitude between field-dependent and field-independent learners in an interactive video simulated chemistry laboratory course utilizing an unstructured hypermedia program with no section questions or a structured hypermedia program with section questions for an entire semester. The study found that students will be able to achieve knowledge of laboratory safety, procedures, and the experiments via interactive video simulated chemistry laboratory experiments, without a decrease in attitude. Field-independent learners did achieve better than field-dependent learners. Beginning general chemistry laboratory classes would profit from a mixture of traditional laboratory and interactive video simulated chemistry laboratory experiments.

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Keywords

Chemistry -- Study and teaching (Higher), Chemistry -- Computer-assisted instruction, Interactive video, Hypertext systems

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