A Texas Notary’s Guide to Estate Planning Documents

dc.contributor.authorBeyer, Gerry W.
dc.date.accessioned2016-05-03T14:47:17Z
dc.date.available2016-05-03T14:47:17Z
dc.date.issued2015-01
dc.description.abstractProperly notarized estate planning documents are necessary to ensure the validity of these signed documents. This article discusses steps notaries should take when acknowledging and notarizing estate planning documents. Documents discussed included the Self-Proving Affidavit, the Durable Power of Attorney, a Declaration of Guardian, a Medical Power of Attorney, a Directive to Physicians, an appointment of agent to control body disposition, and other estate planning documents which do not require notarization but may still be prudent to do so.en_US
dc.identifier.citationGerry W. Beyer, A Texas Notary’s Guide to Estate Planning Documents, Est. Plan. Devs. for Tex. Profs. (Jan. 2015).en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10601/2462
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.relation.urihttp://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=2553854en_US
dc.subjectestate planningen_US
dc.subjectwillsen_US
dc.subjectTexasen_US
dc.subjectnotaryen_US
dc.subjectnotary publicen_US
dc.subjectdocument executionen_US
dc.subjectpower of attorneyen_US
dc.subjectself-proving affidaviten_US
dc.subjectdurable power of attorneyen_US
dc.subjectdeclaration of guardianen_US
dc.subjectmedical power of attorneyen_US
dc.subjectdirective to physiciansen_US
dc.subjectbody disposition agenten_US
dc.titleA Texas Notary’s Guide to Estate Planning Documentsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US

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