The role of seaweed as a potential dietary supplementation for enteric methane mitigation in ruminants: Challenges and opportunities

dc.creatorMin, Byeng R.
dc.creatorParker, David
dc.creatorBrauer, David
dc.creatorWaldrip, Heidi
dc.creatorLockard, Catherine
dc.creatorHales, Kristin E. (TTU)
dc.creatorAkbay, Alexia
dc.creatorAugyte, Simona
dc.date.accessioned2022-06-02T16:19:55Z
dc.date.available2022-06-02T16:19:55Z
dc.date.issued2021
dc.description© 2021 Chinese Association of Animal Science and Veterinary Medicine. Publishing services by Elsevier B.V. on behalf of KeAi Communications Co. Ltd. This is an open access article under the CC BY-NC-ND license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/).en_US
dc.description.abstractSeaweeds are macroalgae, which can be of many different morphologies, sizes, colors, and chemical profiles. They include brown, red, and green seaweeds. Brown seaweeds have been more investigated and exploited in comparison to other seaweed types for their use in animal feeding studies due to their large sizes and ease of harvesting. Recent in vitro and in vivo studies suggest that plant secondary compound-containing seaweeds (e.g., halogenated compounds, phlorotannins, etc.) have the potential to mitigate enteric methane (CH4) emissions from ruminants when added to the diets of beef and dairy cattle. Red seaweeds including Asparagopsis spp. are rich in crude protein and halogenated compounds compared to brown and green seaweeds. When halogenated-containing red seaweeds are used as the active ingredient in ruminant diets, bromoform concentration can be used as an indicator of anti-methanogenic properties. Phlorotannin-containing brown seaweed has also the potential to decrease CH4 production. However, numerous studies examined the possible anti-methanogenic effects of marine seaweeds with inconsistent results. This work reviews existing data associated with seaweeds and in vitro and in vivo rumen fermentation, animal performance, and enteric CH4 emissions in ruminants. Increased understanding of the seaweed supplementation related to rumen fermentation and its effect on animal performance and CH4 emissions in ruminants may lead to novel strategies aimed at reducing greenhouse gas emissions while improving animal productivity.en_US
dc.identifier.citationMin, B. R., Parker, D., Brauer, D., Waldrip, H., Lockard, C., Hales, K., Akbay, A., & Augyte, S. (2021). The role of seaweed as a potential dietary supplementation for enteric methane mitigation in ruminants: Challenges and opportunities. Animal Nutrition, 7(4), 1371–1387. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.aninu.2021.10.003en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.1016/j.aninu.2021.10.003
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2346/89407
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.subjectSeaweeden_US
dc.subjectBromoformen_US
dc.subjectMethaneen_US
dc.subjectPhlorotanninsen_US
dc.subjectRuminanten_US
dc.subjectCattleen_US
dc.titleThe role of seaweed as a potential dietary supplementation for enteric methane mitigation in ruminants: Challenges and opportunitiesen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US

Files

Original bundle

Now showing 1 - 1 of 1
Loading...
Thumbnail Image
Name:
hales_article.pdf
Size:
987.35 KB
Format:
Adobe Portable Document Format
Description:
Main article with TTU Libraries cover page

License bundle

Now showing 1 - 1 of 1
No Thumbnail Available
Name:
license.txt
Size:
1.57 KB
Format:
Item-specific license agreed upon to submission
Description:

Collections