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dc.creatorDo, Sydney
dc.creatorOwens, Andrew
dc.creatorWeck, Olivier de
dc.date.accessioned2015-10-29T17:03:13Z
dc.date.available2015-10-29T17:03:13Z
dc.date.issued2015-07-12
dc.identifier.otherICES-2015-289
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2346/64528
dc.descriptionBellevue, Washington
dc.description.abstractAccomplishing the ultimate goal of a sustained human presence on the surface of Mars requires the clear definition of a technology development and mission roadmap supported by architectural decisions that maximize the probability of achieving all scientific and technical objectives while minimizing the uncertainty in program lifecycle costs. To support this process, we have developed an integrated habitation and supportability architecting and analysis environment called HabNet. HabNet quantitatively evaluates various technology options for a proposed mission architecture in terms of their functional performance, their failure modes, their supportability requirements, and ultimately their initial deployment and lifecycle operational costs. This paper provides an overview of the development and current status of HabNet, and presents two illustrative case studies based on a permanently crewed Mars surface outpost. The first case study quantifies the total lifecycle consumables and spare parts resupply mass required to be delivered to the outpost for five life support system architectures of different levels of resource loop closure, while the second case study investigates the system-level impacts of one-at-a-time subsystem failures and quantifies the time delay between the initiation and impact of each failure on the crew’s wellbeing. Through these analyses, we find that the total mass of the initially emplaced life support system is minor compared to the lifecycle consumables and spare parts resupply requirements, and that a life support system consisting of a water and urine processor assembly supplemented by an open loop oxygen supply may be the most mass efficient in terms of total lifecycle mass. Moreover, we find that with the exception of the time-critical failure of the Carbon Dioxide Removal Assembly, all subsystem failures investigated under the conditions of this study occur over time scales that are long enough to permit repair and recovery operations without depending on backup systems to support the crew during these operations.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisher45th International Conference on Environmental Systemsen_US
dc.titleHabNet – An Integrated Habitation and Supportability Architecting and Analysis Environmenten_US
dc.typePresentationen_US


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