Six Periods a Day, Five Days a Week: Classes Students Miss Most Frequently and Cumulative Impacts on High School Graduation

Abstract

The impact of student absenteeism on educational outcomes has been well documented. However, few studies have looked at day or period level data for attendance trends and outcomes. This study analyzed day of the week, period of the day, and class type data from an urban California district to identify correlations between timing and unexcused absenteeism. Findings suggest that students receiving school services were generally less likely to have an unexcused absence than their peers. Students were also less likely to have an unexcused absence in a class that was required for graduation. The timing of absences for students in poverty showed a link between unexcused absenteeism after the lunch period and an increased risk of dropout. Implications include reframing how to view unexcused absenteeism in groups receiving school services, scheduling of required and academic classes, and engaging at-risk groups

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Citation
Kirksey, J. J., Lansford, T., & J. Elefante. (2023). Six Periods a Day, Five Days a Week: Classes Students Miss Most Frequently and Cumulative Impacts on High School Graduation. Texas Tech University [White paper]. Center for Innovative Research in Change, Leadership, and Education.